Passio by Arvo Pärt : Paul Hillier’s recording

To the accompaniment of the wind buffeting the church of St Jude-on-the-Hill, London, the Hilliard Ensemble here solemnly perform what must surely be the bleakest, most ritualistic Passion to be composed since Heinrich Schutz's settings of the mid seventeenth century. Never one to dress up his religious work in ostentatious garb, Arvo Part has selected … Continue reading Passio by Arvo Pärt : Paul Hillier’s recording

Duke Ellington’s First Sacred Concert : September 16, 1965

In the last decade of his life, Duke Ellington wrote three Sacred Concerts: 1965 - A Concert of Sacred Music 1968 - Second Sacred Concert 1973 - Third Sacred Concert Ellington called these concerts "the most important thing I have ever done". In the Sacred Concerts, Ellington took ecumenical ideals seriously. He didn't write a mass; … Continue reading Duke Ellington’s First Sacred Concert : September 16, 1965

Francisco de Peñalosa : Bruno Turner & Pro Cantione Antiqua

Under strong Flemish influence, Spanish composers of real quality and pronounced character emerged at the end of the fifteenth century, associated with the royal chapels of Ferdinand and Isabella and with the choirs of the great cathedrals, notably Toledo and Seville. Francisco de Peñalosa shares pre-eminence with some fine contemporaries such as the Basque Juan … Continue reading Francisco de Peñalosa : Bruno Turner & Pro Cantione Antiqua

Gregorio Allegri : Renaissance vocal polyphony in its purest form

Gregorio Allegri (1582 -- 17 February 1652) was an Italian composer of the Roman School and brother of Domenico Allegri; he was also a priest and a singer. He lived mainly in Rome, where he would later die. He studied music as a puer (boy chorister) at San Luigi dei Francesi, under the maestro di … Continue reading Gregorio Allegri : Renaissance vocal polyphony in its purest form