John Eliot Gardiner : el Camino de Santiago

John Eliot Gardiner and the Monteverdi Choir did something pretty special in 2004.  They attempted the pilgrimage to Santiago as it might have occurred in the Renaissance period. Gardiner said at the outset: This will be our 40th anniversary year, and I cannot envisage a more fitting way of celebrating this milestone than by undertaking … Continue reading John Eliot Gardiner : el Camino de Santiago

The Rise of Polyphony : Magister Leoninus and Magister Perotinus

I think we tend to take polyphony for granted. We inherited a form of music which has been with us for centuries and, in fact, we have even seen major-minor harmonic polyphony peak in the 18th century and then gradually give way and break down completely.  However, what we take for granted took centuries to … Continue reading The Rise of Polyphony : Magister Leoninus and Magister Perotinus

Born today, Don Carlo Gesualdo is a much maligned polyphonic genius

Carlo Gesualdo da Venosa (8 March 1566 – 8 September 1613) was Prince of Venosa and Count of Conza. As a musician he is best known for writing intensely expressive madrigals and pieces of sacred music that use a chromatic language not heard again until the late 19th century. He is also known for his cruelty … Continue reading Born today, Don Carlo Gesualdo is a much maligned polyphonic genius

Composer Profile: Sophie Lacaze

Website | Mezzo Compo Feature Unsubdued but attentive to musical trends and schools, French composer Sophie Lacaze has developed an original aesthetics that takes into account the current research on sound while looking to restore music its primary functions, i.e. ritual, incantation, dance, and its links with nature. Sophie Lacaze studied music at the Conservatoire National de … Continue reading Composer Profile: Sophie Lacaze